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Meat can be Murder on Long-term Health …

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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

… so says Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Forbes Magazine. “Would we all be better off if we dramatically reduced meat to the point of one meal a week? I would say yes,” says Dr. Bob Lawrence, director of the Center for a Livable Future at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “But the reality is that, from a public health perspective, if we just get some modest reductions in our intake of saturated fats, it’ll have a big impact.” If you just can’t stand never tasting meat again, at least reduce your intake drastically. It is clear to most scientist and doctors that the increased saturated fats most Americans are eating, is the root cause of cancers and many other diseases. We have a choice! Don’t get sick and ask “Why me?”

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Our Meat Consumption is up, but is America at it’s Peak?

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Allison Van Dusen of Forbes says In 2000, total meat consumption, including red meat, poultry and fish, reached 195 pounds per person — 57 pounds above the average annual consumption in the 1950s, according to the USDA Agriculture Fact Book, 2001-2002, the latest version. In all, Americans consumed about 7 pounds more red meat, 46 pounds more poultry and 4 pounds more fish and shellfish than in the 1950s. It is these increases in saturated fat that has turned American health bad. We are eating more meat and animal protein than we ever did. Are bodies have not evolved to digest this amount of animal protein. Try reducing your consumption by following meatless Mondays and then increase it so you eventually get to eating meat only once a week. If you have the power to give it up completely go vegetarian or better yet vegan.

Meat Can be Murder on Long Term Health

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meat (Photo credit: hmmlargeart)

Allison Van Dusen of Forbes says reducing your saturated fat intake, animal products, can significantly improve your health. “Would we all be better off if we dramatically reduced meat to the point of one meal a week? I would say yes,” says Dr. Bob Lawrence, director of the Center for a Livable Future at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “But the reality is that, from a public health perspective, if we just get some modest reductions in our intake of saturated fats, it’ll have a big impact.” So if you are not ready to become a vegetarian or vegan, try really hard to reduce your animal protein intake by eating much less meat, eggs, milk, cheese and butter. Your health is your choice! Choose wisely.